Graeme Skinner
Austral Harmony
Music and musicians in colonial Australia

Going to the bush to practice
Austral Harmony ...
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Graeme Skinner
FORTHCOMING PRESENTATIONS
MONDAY 28 APRIL 2014
Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney): “Uncovering the foundations: the colonial pre-history of Sydney Conservatorium”, invited public lecture, in About music: Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney, 2014 Monday Public Lecture Series (convened by Prof. Linda Barwick), 28 April 2014, 5:30-6:30, Recital Hall East
MONDAY 21 JULY 2014
Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney): “A fatal comeuppance? Chevalier Bochsa finally goes to Botany Bay”, invited paper, to the 12th World Harp Congress, Sydney, Australia, Monday 21 July 2014, 9am, Four Seasons Hotel Ballroom, Sydney
 
RECENT PRESENTATIONS
23 NOVEMBER 2013: “Musical “Sydney moderns” between the two world wars?” : paper at Raymond Hanson Centenary Symposium, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney
4 NOVEMBER 2013: “Sydney Cecilians and Dilettanti: implanting the science and practice of music in early colonial Australia, 1838–1842” : paper presented at Global Corelli Conference, School of Music, Australian National University, Canberra
30 OCTOBER 2013: “The invention of Australian music and music in (early colonial) Australia” : paper presented in Musicology Colloquium Series, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney
 
AUSTRAL HARMONY
CORE CONTENTS
Constantly being updated with new and corrected material  
BIOGRAPHICAL REGISTER
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians A-B
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians C-D
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians E-G
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians H-J
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians K-L
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians M-N
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians O-R
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians S-T
A biographical register of colonial Australian musicians U-Z
ORGANISATIONAL REGISTER
An organisational register of colonial Australian music and musicians A-Z
CHRONOLOGICAL CHECKLIST
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1788-1840
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1841-1850
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1851-1855
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1856-1860
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1861-1865
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1866-1870
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1871-1880
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1881-1890
A chronological checklist of colonial compositions 1891-1900
BIBLIOGRAPHY
A bibliography of colonial Australian music
READINGS
Readings in colonial Australian music history
IMPORTED REPERTOIRE
Nineteenth-century musical sources online
OTHER ARTICLES
Searching for Stephen Marsh's The Gentleman in Black
1888 Melbourne Centennial Exhibition Orchestral Series
John Onions
convict musician
George Skinner
{fl. 1844-48}
Sydney Catch Club
Emile Coulon
Windsor Band
A lost colonial opera archive
Beethoven in Australia 1827
 
RECOMMENDED SITES


Trove The National Library of Australia's centralised portal to the electronic catalogues and virtual archives of Australia's library, heritage, arts, and culture sector. Other key participants include the state libraries and major museums and galleries
Petrucci Music Library The world's largest and most reliable repository of out-ot-copyright classical music scores downloadable in PDF format
Australian Dictionary of Biography Concise, basically informative (if not always now supremely reliable) introductions to over 12,000 significant and representative people in Australian history ... unfortunately the selection and treatment of 19th-century subjects, dating mostly from the 1960s and 1970s, is showing its age, biases, and omissions ... the ADB is now partly atoning for its colonial shortcomings by adding its excellent Obituaries Australia and its Digitised Biographies acrhive of key earlier printed biographical sources 
Papers Past (NZ) Digitised New Zealand newspapers and periodicals from 1839 to 1945, includes 77 publications from all regions of NZ
Australian Variety Theatre Archive A superb resource for musical-theatrical entertainments 1850-1930, Curated by Clay Djubal
Warren Fahey's AUSTRALIAN FOLKLORE UNIT The personal online archive of leading Australian performer and collector of our folk music heritage
Heather Clark's AUSTRALIAN COLONIAL DANCE An informative and attractively presented online collection of dances, dance music, and and dance history from the early colonial Australia  1770-1850 
SHEET MUSIC CONSORTIUM (19th Century Sheet Music Online) Gateway to the largest virtual archive of 19th century printed popular sheet music; contributors include major repositories in the USA and  Australia (NLA Trove);archive contents are also searchable through TROVE
The Full English Digital Archive (The English Folk Dance and Song Society)
Irish Traditional Music Archive (Ireland’s national reference for the traditional song, instrumental music and dance)
Traditional Music Forum (Scotland’s traditional music network)
Music in Gotham: the New York scene 1862-75

PAGE LAST UPDATED 1 MARCH 2014

A chronological checklist of colonial Australian musical compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions c.1788-1840

TO CITE THIS PAGE

Graeme Skinner, “A chronoligical checklist of Australian colonial musical compositions, arrangements, and transcriptions c.1788-1840”, Austral Harmony (a resource for music and musicians in early colonial Australia), @ www.graemeskinner.id.au; accessed [INSERT DATE]

This is a revised and corrected version of the relevant section of the checklist that appeared originally in my doctoral thesis (2011), and will be further updated when new information becomes available.

This checklist is a work-in-progress, an attempt to list all the documentable original songs, dances, and musical works created in the Australian colonies during the early colonial period. Included as first priority are documented instances of Indigenous songs and dances, not suggesting that these listings represent anything other than incomplete and often incomprehending accounts of settlers colonists. There are a huge number of these documented instances, and even they will probably never be listed completely. Of second importance, are documented instances of original composed musical works. Of third, but hardly in the early colonial context lesser importance than the second, are the large number of new song lyrics written to and performed with existing imported tunes. Many of these latter were political satires, published in the press; and if we might tend today to regard them solely as written verse, I believe it is highly likely that most of them were in fact sung, even if only by readers fitting them to a suitable tune in their heads. We should not underestimate the performative value of such imagined tunes among early colonists, who, if they did not make music themselves, or were lucky enough to hear someone else do so, must have often had to make do, musically, with memories and singing to themselves in their heads. Fourth, are local arrangements and/or collections of mostly imported musical items (e.g. song anthologies, hymn books) that, it could be argued, are nevertheless editorially or otherwise distinctive of and peculiar to their colonial circumstances.

If you know of anything that I should add to these lists, please contact me. I will be pleased to acknowledge your input accordingly.

 

  Indicates a work whose music is not known to have survived in either MS or print, though occasionally, as indicated, the words may have survived      
Date (earliest documentation) Composer, arranger, transcriber, orchestrator, songwriter, editor, collector/recorder  Title (detials) Publication or preservation details for surviving music and/or texts Supporting documentation; notes
         
1770-05-20 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1770)
Song of the Badjala People (on seeing the ship Endeavour passing Fraser Island, QLD, on 20 May 1770)   Tony Swain, A place for strangers: toward a history of Australian Aboriginal being (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 114f: http://books.google.com/books?id=d80wTnMnc0AC; http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/8483136
         
1790-12-00 INDIGENOUS
(Australia, fl.1790)

BENNELONG (reported)
(Australia c.1764-1813)
A song (“Bannelong […] had lately been at Botany-Bay, where, he said, they danced, and that one of the tribe had sung a song, the subject of which was, his [Bennelong's] house, the governor, and the white men at Sydney”)   John Hunter, An historical journal of the transactions at Port Jackson and Norfolk Island (London: Printed for John Stockdale, 1793), 493; online modern edition, searchable text:
         
1793-00-00 BENNELONG
(Australia c.1764-1813)

YAMMROWENEY
(Australia; d. England 1794)
 
JONES, Edward (arr.)
(UK 1752-1824)
[1] A Song of the Natives of New South Wales; The same Harmonized with a Bass, by the Editor (vocal short score)

[2] A Song of the Natives of New South Wales (melody line only)
[1] Edward Jones, Musical curiosities: or a selection of the most characteristic national songs and airs […] consisting of Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Danish, Lapland, Malabar, New South Wales […] (London: Printed for the author, 1811), 15; copy at London, BL, R.M.13.f.5, reproduced in Keith Vincent Smith (ed.), Mari Nawi: Aboriginal odysseys 1790-1850 (Sydney: SLNSW, 2010), 20 

[2] Carl Engel, An introduction to the study of national music (London, Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1866), 26-27
 
“A SONG OF THE NATIVES OF NEW SOUTH WALES; Which was written down from the Singing of BENELONG, and YAM-ROWENY, the two Chiefs, who were brought to England some years ago from Botany Bay, by Governor Phillips [sic]. The subject of the Song, is in praise of their Lovers; and when they Sang, it seem’d indispensible to them to have two sticks, one in each hand to beat time with the Tune […]”

Smith, Mari Nawi (2010), dated the performance to sometime in 1793, at the singers’ then lodgings at the home William Waterhouse at 125 Mount Street, Mayfair, near Berkeley Square, London; Smith discovered that Jones, a Welsh harpist and bard to the Prince of Wales (later George IV), lived at 122 Mount Street
         
1802 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl. Winter-Spring 1802)

LESUEUR, Charles-Alexandre (transcr..)
(France 1778-1846)
{Australia 1802-03}

BERNIER, Pierre-François (transcri.)
(France 1779-1803)
{Australia 1802-03}
[1] 1 Chant; 2 Air de danse; 3 Cri de ralliement (Cou-hé) (“Musique des Naturels. Nouvelle Hollandia. N[ouv]elle Galles du Sud […] Lesure et Bernier notaverunt”); (“Pl.32: Musique de sauvages de la Nouvelle-Galles du Sud. Divers airs notés”)

[2] No 3 Air; No 5 Kouhi [= 1 and 3 above]
[1] François Péron & Louis de Freycinet, Voyage de Decouvertes aux Terres Australes: Atlas par Mm. Lesueur et Petit (2e ed. revue, corrigee et augmentee par Louis de Freycinet; Paris: Arthus Bertrans, 1824), plate 32

[2] Louis de Freycinet, Voyage Autour du Monde: Entrepris par Ordre du Roi ... Exécuté sur les corvettes de S. M. l'Uranie et la Physicienne, pendant les années 1817, 1818, 1819 et 1820, Historique, Tome Deuxième— Deuxième Partie (Paris: Chez Pillet Ainé, 1839), 775
Noted down by members of Nicolas Baudin’s expedition in NSW, Winter and Spring 1802, and added by Freycinet to the second edition of the Atlas; some details of the visit appear in the text of volume 1 of the 1824 edition; see on Bernier, on Lesueur
         
1802 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1802)
Song of the Badjala People (on seeing the Flinders' ship passing Fraser Island, QLD, in 1802)   Tony Swain, A place for strangers: toward a history of Australian Aboriginal being (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 114f: http://books.google.com/books?id=d80wTnMnc0AC; http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/8483136
         
1804-05-13 ANONYMOUS Banti (song)   “TO A CORRESPONDENT”, The Sydney Gazette (13 May 1804), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article626190
         
1805-11-20 FLINDERS, Matthew (words/arr.)
(England 1774-1814)
{Australia 1795-1803}
My Evening Song (“Why Henry didst thou leave me, thus leave me here to mourn?“) (MS song, music “by Haydn” [unidentified], words by Flinders, left incomplete at end, sent from Mauritius to his wife Ann, November 1805)   MS at National Maritime Museum, Greenwich: http://flinders.rmg.co.uk/DisplayDocument1c2d.html?ID=139; facsimile in Catharine Retter and Shirley Sinclair, Letters to Ann (Sydney, Angus and Robertson, 1999), 76; modern edition by Gillian Dooley
         
1809-01-26 ANONYMOUS

[? DAVOREN, Lawrence
(Ireland 1762-?)
{Australia 1793-1814}]
A new song made in New South Wales on the Rebellion (to the tune of Health to the Duchess) MS, SL-NSW: William Bligh—Papers relating to his term as Governor of New South Wales, 1805-1811 Dated 26 January 1809; possibly by the Irish convict attorney Lawrence Davoren; see A new song: made in New South Wales on the rebellion by (Lawrence Davoren), edited with an essay on historical detection, notes and commentary by George Mackaness (Sydney: D. S. Ford, 1951)

The original tune was that to Air 1, Scene 1, I can't for the life guess the cause of this fuss / ... / ... / Joy and health to the Duchess, wherever she goes, in Charles Dibdin's The Deserter
         
1810s        
         
1810-10-20 ANONYMOUS Murtoch Delaney’s Description of the Races (to the tune Ballynamony-ora)   Words: The Sydney Gazette (20 October 1810), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628109

Music: For a setting of the tune, see this early London edition of The Irish Volunteers (Ballynamona Oro)
         
1810-10-20 WILLIAMS, Mr. Song, prepared for the festive occasion (to the tune To Anachreon in Heaven)   Words: “THE SUBSCRIBERS’ BALL”, The Sydney Gazette (20 October 1810), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628106
         
1817-02-01 JENKINS, Mr. (words) Song (To the Tune of Rule Britannia) (When first Australia rose to fame)   [News], The Sydney Gazette (1 February 1817), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177051; “SONG”, The Sydney Gazette (1 February 1817), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177044
         
1819-00-00 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl. 1803 & 1819)

FREYCINET, Louis de (transcr.)
(France 1779-1842)
{Australia 1802-03; 1819}
[1] No 1 Danse du Kanguroo; No 2 Air de danse; No 3 Air; No 4 Air de péche; No 5 Kou-hi

[2] Kangaroo Dance [No.1 above]
[1] Louis de Freycinet, Voyage Autour du Monde: Entrepris par Ordre du Roi ... Exécuté sur les corvettes de S. M. l'Uranie et la Physicienne, pendant les années 1817, 1818, 1819 et 1820, Historique, Tome Deuxième— Deuxième Partie (Paris: Chez Pillet Ainé, 1839), 774-75

[2] Carl Engel, An introduction to the study of national music (London, Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1866), 238
Printed in Freycinet’s 1839 account of his 1819 return visit to Australia; Nos. 1 and 4 printed there for the first time; as noted in the respective entries, Nos. 3 and 5 reproduced from the Baudin expedition (Péron & Freycinet, 2nd edn 1824), No.2 from Barron Field (1823-25) (for main entry on which, see below); Freycinet (1839), 830, also notes the existence of John Lhotsky’s 1834 transcription (see below), in order to correct Lhostky’s claim that his was the “premiere spécimen de musique australienne”, by citing the priority of the Baudin and Field.
         
1820s        
         
1820-02-05 ROBINSON, Michael Massey (words)
(England 1744-1826)
{Australia 1798-26}
Song for the Commemoration Dinner, January 26, 1820 (Alive to the strain that gay fancy inspires)   Words: [News], The Sydney Gazette (5 February 1820), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179245
         
1820-12-09 “AN INCOGNITO” Song (Air – The Girl I left behind me) (As slow our ship her foamy track)   “SONG”, The Sydney Gazette (9 December 1820), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179924
         
1822-02-08 ROBINSON, Michael Massey (words)
(England 1744-1826)
{Australia 1798-26}
Song for the Commemoration Dinner, 1822 (Philosophers say, and experience declares)   Words: [News], The Sydney Gazette (8 February 1822), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180809
         
1823-01-15 ANONYMOUS
(Scotland fl.1823)
{Australia 1823-?}
The Emigrant (“A Song Written on the eve of a Lady’s Embarking from Leith with her relations for Van Diemen’s Land […] Edinburgh Jan[uar]y 15 1823”) Edinburgh: Walker & Anderson, Engravers, [1823]  
         
1823-08-21 ANONYMOUS Song (for Underwood’s Ball and Supper) (The claims of affection are dear to our hearts)   Words: [News], The Sydney Gazette (21 August 1823), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182128
         
1823-11-00 HARRY
(Australia fl.1817-24?)

FIELD, Barron (transcr.)
(England 1786-1846)
{Australia 1817-24}
[1] Australian National Melody

[2] Australian National Melody

[3] No 2 Air de danse
[1] Barron Field, “Journal of an Excursion Across the Blue Mountains”, The London Magazine (November 1823), 465

[2] Barron Field, Geographical Memoirs on New South Wales; by Various Hands (London: John Murray, 1825), 433-34

[3] Louis de Freycinet, Voyage Autour du Monde: Entrepris par Ordre du Roi ... Exécuté sur les corvettes de S. M. l'Uranie et la Physicienne, pendant les années 1817, 1818, 1819 et 1820, Historique, Tome Deuxième— Deuxième Partie (Paris: Chez Pillet Ainé, 1839), 775
“From the neighbourhood of our settlements we have scared the kangaroo and the emu, and left these poor lords of the creation no created food but a few opossums, and a tenancy in common with us of fish. Together with their numbers, their customs and manners are in a state of decay […] But the corrobory, or night dance, still obtains. This festivity is performed in good time, and not unpleasing tune. The song is sung by a few males and females who take no part in the dance. One of the band beats time by knocking one stick against another. The music begins with a high note, and gradually sinks to the octave, whence it rises again immediately to the top. I took down the following Australian national melody from Harry, who married Carangarang, the sister of the celebrated Bennilong; and I believe it to be the first that was ever reduced to writing.” (Field, 1823, 465)
         
1824-01-29 ROBINSON, Michael Massey words) (England 1744-1826) {Australia 1798-26} Song, for the Commemoration Dinner, 1824 (Whilst the gay Sons of Harmony socially join)   [News], The Sydney Gazette (29 January 1824), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182598

Words: “THE XXXVITH AUSTRALIAN ANNIVERSARY 1824”, The Sydney Gazette (5 February 1824), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182628  
         
1824-03-04 “AUSTRALASIANUS” (words) A Song, written tor the XXVIth January last, being the [X]XXVIth Anniversary of the establishment of this Colony (When first above the briny surge)   Words: “A SONG” The Sydney Gazette (4 March 1824), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182691
         
1824-04-01 HALLORAN, Laurence Hynes (words)
“LORENZO” (pseud., Sydney, 1824)
“The Rev. L. BLAKENEY” (pseud., Bath, 1814)

CAVE, Eliza (music)
(fl. Bath, England, 1814)
The blush and the tear (written by the Rev. L. Blakeney; music by Eliza Cave; with an accompaniment for the Pianoforte) (Lovely are the drops that rise) London, [1814]

Copy at London, BL: System number 004260031; Music Collections H.1665.(28.); UIN: BLL01004260031
“POETRY. THE BLUSH AND THE TEAR”, The Sydney Gazette (1 April 1824), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182760; “To the Editor”, The Sydney Gazette (8 April 1824), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2182777

On Halloran’s adoption for this and other publications, c. 1813-15, of the name Blakeney (probably from his own lineage, the Hynes/Blakeney family), see James Alexander Hewitt, Sketches of English Church History in South Africa, from 1795 to 1848 (Cape Town: J. C. Juta, 1887), 23-24, and 104 (notes 7-10): https://archive.org/stream/sketchesofenglis00hewi#page/22 (also 104, notes 7-10)
         
1824-07-30 MURRAY, H. N. (words)
{Australia fl. 1823-24)
Valedictory Song (On leaving Scotland for Van Diemen’s Land) (Edina's towers a last adieu!)     Words: “VALEDICTORY SONG”, Hobart Town Gazette (30 July 1824), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article1090278
         
1825-02-03 “AVEC FRANCHASE” (pseud.) (words)
{Australia fl.1824-25}
Song (composed expressly for the occasion … by “Avec Franchase”)   “ANNIVESRARY DINNER”, The Australian (3 February 1825), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37073278:  The song of “Avec  Franchase“ was in his best style, and the companybesides being gratified with this fresh specimen of his poetry, were indebted to him for a sample also of his vocal powers, which, we, are bound in justice to admit,fully equal his poetic. 
         
1825-02-03 ROBINSON, Michael Massey (words)
(England 1744-1826)
{Australia 1798-26}
Song (“The Annals of London’s Emporium have told”) (composed expressly for the occasion by Mr. Robinson … to the tune of Derry Down)   Words: “ANNIVESRARY DINNER”, The Australian (3 February 1825), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37073278

Tune (imported): Probably a variant of the English major-key melody Derry Down, as later given in Chappell’s Popular music of the olden time, vol.2, 677
         
1825-03-10 ANONYMOUS Mira of the Vale (a song in the style and to  the air of Jessie o’Dumblain) (Calm eve hung her shades o’er yon wood-crown’d blue mountain)   Words: “NUGAE AUSTRALES”, The Australian (10 March 1825), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37071809
         
1825-04-28 REICHENBERG, Joseph
(Italy c.1789/92-1851)
{Australia 1824-51}
A First Set of Quadrilles for Australia (“Australian Quadrilles”)   [Advertisement], “AUSTRALIAN QUADRILLES”, The Sydney Gazette (28 April 1825), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2183967; [Advertisement]: “AUSTRALIAN QUADRILLES”, The Australian (28 April 1825), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37074539
         
1825-06-16 “DR. WIGWAM” A Quid-Ditty (excellent new song) (WE two fine fellows, the season has sent forth, /Myself, Dr. W. and my friend Mr. W[entwort]h)   “TO THE EDITOR”, The Sydney Gazette (16 June 1825), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184132
         
1825-09-29 “J. M.” The Races O (A New Song to an Old Tune) (Old travellers, folks say, who from here to there are dancing)   “THE RACES O”, The Australian (29 September 1825), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37072619
         
1825-11-10 ROBINSON, Michael Massey (words)
(England 1744-1826)
{Australia 1798-26}
Song (“The trophies of freedom transcendent have shone“) (“composed and sung by that old son of the Muses”)   Words: “PUBLIC DINNER”, The Sydney Gazette (10 November 1825), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184661 “Sydney Intelligence”, Colonial Times (2 December 1825), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2446678

Tune: Plausibly Derry Down, as for 1825-02-03 above; see tune later given in Chappell’s Popular music of the olden time, vol.2, 677  
         
1825-12-22 ANONYMOUS

[ ? KAVANAGH, Thomas
(Ireland c.1800-?)
{Australia 1823-27} ]
Welcome to Australia     “HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR IN CHIEF”, The Sydney Gazette (22 December 1825), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184905: “The Lieutenant Governor then escorted His EXCELLENCY [Governor Darling] through the military lane […] preceded by the full Band of the Buffs, playing Welcome to Australia”; at Darling’s inauguration; possibly already a traditional item passed down from one serving regimental band to the next; but also possibly newly composed by the master of the Buffs’ band, Thomas Kavanagh (see below).
         
1825-12-15 “A. S. G.” (words) The Russian Slave Boy (or, Companion to “Avec Franchase”) (Air—Home, sweet home! [words by] A. S. G., North Shore, 1825”)   Words: “LADIES RHYMES”, The Australian (15 December 1825), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37071672

Tune (imported): One of the earliest records of Bishop’s recent song having found its way to NSW; for a later Sydney edition, lithographed from a London original, see Home, sweet Home
         
1826-01-05 INDIGENOUS
(Austraiia fl. 1826)

THRELKELD, Lancelot E. (transcr.)
(England 1788-1859)
{Australia 1824-59}
Two Australian Aboriginal Songs (transliteration  only) Words only: “POETRY: AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINAL SONG”, The Sydney Gazette (5 January 1826), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184973  
c.1826   Nga ba ya! (“Rondo”) (transliteration only)   [E. L. Threlkeld], Language of the Australian Aborigines; Aborigines—the muses—poetry, in Waugh’s Australian almanac, for the year 1858, 21 and 22 Victoriae (Sydney: James. W. Waugh, 1858), 72:
         
1826-01-05 KAVANAGH, Thomas
(Ireland c.1800-?)
{Australia 1823-27}
General Ralph Darling’s Australian Slow March [Advertisement]: “ORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN MUSIC”, The Sydney Gazette (5 January 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2184974; [Advertisement]: “ORIGINAL AUSTRALIAN MUSIC”, The Australian (5 January 1826), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37071849
General Darling’s Quick Step As above.
Mrs. Darling’s Waltz
    His Honor Colonel Stewart’s Slow March, Hail Australia!  
    Sir Thomas Brisbane’s Grand Australian March  
    Sir Thomas Brisbane’s Grand Australian Quick March  
    Lady Brisbane’s Waltz  
    My Native Distant Home (Scotch Air)  
    Currency Lasses  
    The Trumpet Sounds Australia’s Fame (“A new song”; “bravura”) (words only survive) Words only: [News], The Sydney Gazette (26 July 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2186245 As above, and: “THE AMATEUR CONCERT”, The Monitor (21 July 1826), 5: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31757663; “SYDNEY AMATEUR CONCERT”, The Sydney Gazette (22 July 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2186232; “THE CONCERT”, The Australian (22 July 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37073176; “SYDNEY AMATEUR CONCERT”, The Sydney Gazette (24 July 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2186232
         
1826-02-01 ROBINSON, Michael Massey (words)
(England 1744-1826)
{Australia 1798-26}
SONG, BY Mr. M. ROBINSON (for the Anniversary Dinner) (In Olympus we're told / The celestials of old)   Words: “ANNIVERSARY DINNER”, The Sydney Gazette (1 February 1825), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2185167
         
1826-04-29 ANONYMOUS Australian Air   [News], The Hobart Town Gazette (29 April 1826), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8790487: “His Excellency gave the health of Governor Darling, and the prosperity of the sister Colony, when the new and beautiful Australian Air was struck up”; the band was that of the 40th Regiment, under Joseph Reichenberg, who may have brought the Australian Air with him from Sydney, plausibly his own composition, or one of Thomas Kavanagh’s.
         
1826-10-04 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
Rondo (“clarionet”) (“a Rondeau, composed by Mr. Sippe”)   Added to an Air and Variations by Druett [Drouet] on Believe me if all those endearing bright charms; [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (4 October 1826), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2186645; [Advertisement], The Monitor (6 October 1826), 5: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31757880; “MR. SIPPE’S BENEFIT CONCERT”, The Monitor (13 October 1826), 5: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31757909
         
1826-10-14 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl. c.1826)
Short songs (made by the Aborigines of New Holland, inhabiting the country round Bathurst “on many of the settlers here“)   [Letter] “To the Editors”, The Australian (14 October 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article37071836:

“I transmit you some sketches of the manners and customs, &c. of the Aborigines of New Holland, inhabiting the country round Bathurst […] Their dispositions are generally cheerful; they are great songsters, and have made short songs on many of the settlers here. Some they praise, and some they ridicule in their songs […]”
         
1826-12-01 ANONYMOUS Australian March   “ST ANDREW’S DAY”, Colonial Times (1 December 1826), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2448996; played by Reichenberg’s Band of the 40th Regiment in answer to a toast to General Darling and “the Sister Colony” [New South Wales]; perhaps one of Riechenberg’s own works, or one of Kavanagh’s compositions; see also Australian Air above.
         
1827-01-16 KAVANAGH, Thomas
(Ireland c.1800-?)
{Australia 1823-27}
New music (“vocal and instrumental, composed by Mr. Cavenagh”)   [News], The Sydney Gazette (16 January 1827), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2187390; the promised benefit concert at which this new music was to be played seems not to have taken place; Kavanagh left with his regiment for India 0n 28 January.
         
1827-01-27 ANONYMOUS Governor’s March   “THE ANNIVERSARY DINNER”, The Monitor (27 January 1827), 5: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31758157; perhaps one of Kavanagh’s two marches for Governor Darling (see above); the band is not named, but it was perhaps Kavanagh’s on one of its last Sydney appearances.
         
1827-03-09 PEARSON, James
(England ?-1841)
{Australia 1825-41}
Magnificat (“chaunt […] arranged by Mr. Pearson”)   [News], The Monitor (9 March 1827), 8: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31758255: “The choir of St. James’s Church, will chaunt on Sunday evening next, the Magnificat, arranged by Mr. Pearson, who has accepted the office of leader.”
         
1827-08-06 ANONYMOUS A New Song Called Don Ferola Whiskerando (Tune – Blue Bells of Scotland)   “A New Song”, The Sydney Gazette (6 August 1827), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2188708

Perhaps refers to the case tobacconist T. H. James brought against Laurence Halloran, editor of The Gleaner: “Supreme Court. Monday”, The Monitor (24 September 1827), 8: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31758928
         
1827-11-12 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
Australian Troop (“air […] by Mr. Sippy”)   “TURF CLUB DINNER”, The Monitor (12 November 1827), 6s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31759112
         
1827-11-12 ANONYMOUS Sydney Lasses (“air“)   “TURF CLUB DINNER”, The Monitor (12 November 1827), 6s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31759112
         
1828-00-00 DAWSON, Robert
(England 1782-1866)
{Australia 1825-28}
[1] Song of the Natives: We all sit down together

[2] Song of the Natives: We all sit down together
[1] Robert Dawson, The Present State of Australia: a description of the country, its advantages and prospects, with reference to emigration: and a particular account of the manners, customs, and condition of its aboriginal inhabitants (London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1830), 134

[2] Robert Dawson, The Present State of Australia … (2nd edn; London: Smith, Elder and Co., 1831), 134
“[The wild natives] generally have an excellent ear for [music], and those who usually attended me were in the habit of accompanying my flute in chorus, which they did in excellent tune and time. I was in the habit, and especially when I wished to keep them cheerful, of singing and playing the following simple strain to them, with any words the occasion might call for […]” (Dawson, 1830, 133-34
         
1828-01-28 DEANE, John Philip
(England 1796-1849)
{Australia 1822-49}
The First Set of Tasmanian Quadrilles (“by J. P. Deane”)   [Advertisement]: “MRS. DEANE […] Just published”, The Hobart Town Courier (28 January 1828), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4224849; despite being advertised as “just published”, Deane’s quadrilles were not printed, but for sale as MS copies
         
1828-05-30 ANONYMOUS (ed.) A selection of Psalms and Hymns [Sydney: Printed at the Gazette Office, 1828]

NO COPY IDENTIFIED
[News], The Sydney Gazette (30 May 1828), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2190487: “one thousand copies … have recently been printed at the Gazette Office, copies of which may be had on application to the Clerk of the old Church [St. Philip’s], in Sydney.”
         
1828-08-01 ANONYMOUS A Song, by the Convict, in Van Diemen’s Land Words only, in Andrew Bent’s Colonial Advocate 1 (1828) [Advertisement], Colonial Times (1 August 1828), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8644005
         
1828-08-09 REICHENBERG, Joseph
(Italy c.1789/92-1851)
{Australia 1824-51}
The Hobarton Quadrilles (1 The safe arrival; 2 The Scotch settler; 3 The English settler; 4 The Irish settler; 5 The Union)   “Quadrilles”, The Hobart Town Courier (9 August 1828), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4221623
         
1828-08-09 REICHENBERG, Joseph
(Italy c.1789/92-1851)
{Australia 1824-51}
Another Set of Quadrilles for the 40th Regiment (1 La Peninsula; 2 La Waterloo; 3 La Paris; 4 L’Australia; 5 La Tasmania)   “Quadrilles”, The Hobart Town Courier (9 August 1828), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4221623; Reichenberg may well have joined the 40th Regiment during the Peninsular campaign, having previously served in the Chasseurs Britanniques, and thus would plausibly have been himself a veteran of all five theatres of operation mentioned in the titles.
         
1828-12-23 ANONYMOUS Land, Land, Land, Land (Song of the Maidens; A New Song to an Old Tune)   “Land—LAND—LAND—LAND. SONG OF THE MAIDENS”, The Australian (23 December 1828), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36865555
         
1829-09-12 ANONYMOUS Stanzas to be set to music (“The Dram-a and the Dram-o”) Words only: “Rejected Addresses [No 1]: To have been spoken at the Opening of the Opera House, Sydney, August 1829”, The Sydney Gazette (12 September 1829), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2193399  
         
1830s        
         
? Before early 1830s ? INDIGENOUS
(? Australia fl. before early 1830s)

DOMENY DE RIENZI, Grégoire Louis (arr./transcr.)
(France 1789-1843)
{? Australia}
Air australien des sauvages de la terre d’Arnheim G. L. Domeny de Rienzi, Oceanie; ou cinquieme partie du monde … Tome premier (Paris: Firmin Didot Frères, 1836), 81 It is not known when Domeny de Rienzi actually set foot in Northern Australia; but he had reportedly arrived at Bombay, via the Red Sea, as early as late 1825.
         
1830-07-06 PEARSON, James
(England ?-1841)
{Australia 1825-41}
Responses in the Communion Service (“the composition of Mr. PEARSON, the Organist”)   [News], The Sydney Gazette (6 July 1830), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2195472: “That beautiful piece of sacred music adapted to the responses in the Communion Service, and sung by the choir of St. James’s Church, is the composition of Mr. PEARSON, the Organist.”
         
1830-08-28 ANONYMOUS (ed.) [1] The selection of Psalms and Hymns … (as sung in St. David’s)

[2] SELECT portions of the Psalms of David, with a collection of Hymns (arranged as they are sung by the congregation of St. David’s Church, Hobart town)
[1] [Hobart: Courier Office, 1830]

[2] [Hobart: Courier Office, 1833]

NO COPIES IDENTIFIED
[News], The Courier (28 August 1830), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4207501: “The selection of Psalms and Hymns published at the Courier office, will be used in St. David’s Church tomorrow.”; [Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (9 April 1831), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4204152; [Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (31 May 1833), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4192286: “As this little collection of the most beautiful psalms and hymns forms an excellent leading junior class book for schools, the attention of teachers and others is invited to it, to whom on purchasing a quantity a very libel allowance will be made. The soft and easy flowing metres of this version are singularly calculated as exercises, to improve and harmonize the voice and to smooth the progress of the juvenile reader.”
         
1830-10-16 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1830)

ANONYMOUS (transcr.)
Native melodies of our Van Diemen’s land Blacks (“Some of our musical amateurs have lately made some progress in recording [these], but what we have seen are of the rudest and most uncouth kind, though doubt not without their charms to the sable ear”)   [News], The Hobart Town Courier (16 October 1830), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4206714
         
1831-09-03 MOORE, George
(Ireland 1798-1886)
{Australia 1830-52}
Western Australia for Me (Air: “Ballinamona oro“) George F. Moore, Diary of ten years eventful life of an early settler in Western Australia and also a descriptive vocabulary of the language of the Aborigines (London: M. Walbrook, 1884), 65 Moore, Diary, 58: “[I] have just written for Mrs. Tanner a song about this colony, of which she wishes to send her friends a copy ; but I have not time now to transcribe it, but must do so at some other time. I have a song in my mind, suggested by that of a bird's notes ; and if I can get my flute mended, shall set it for you.“

“ST. PATRICK’S DAY”, The Perth Gazette (21 March 1840), 30: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article638772

For a setting of the tune, see this early London edition of The Irish Volunteers (Ballynamona Oro)
         
1832-01-21 REICHENBERG, Joseph
(Italy c.1789/92-1851)
{Australia 1824-51}
Tasmanian New Quadrilles and Country Dances for 1832   [Advertisement]: “TASMANIAN NEW QUADRILLES”, The Hobart Town Courier (21 January 1832), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4200325
         
1832-07-14 JUVENAL (pseud.) (words)
Australian Courtship [also later referred to as The Currency Lasses] (The Currency Lads may fill their glasses) (Genuine Botany Bay Eclogues, No.I … An excellent new Song, as it ought to be sung in the Theatre Royal, Sydney, by Mr. B[arnet]t L[eve]y, in the character of the TICKET-OF-LEAVE HOLDER)   “The Editor’s Miscellany”, The Sydney Gazette (14 July 1832), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2207552; “To the Editor”, Colonial Times (21 August 1832), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8646662; see also: http://www.austlit.edu.au/austlit/page/C718886; the “Genuine” of the title is a reference to the English poet Robert Southey’s (inauthentic) Botany Bay Eclogues (written 1793; pub. 1797)
         
1832-07-17 JUVENAL (pseud.) (words)
The Happy Family (I will sing you a song of a settler bold) (Botany Bay Eclogues No.II)   “The Editor's Miscellany. Soirée II”, The Sydney Gazette (17 July 1832), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2207594; see also: http://www.austlit.edu.au/austlit/page/C718886
         
1832-10-00 INDIGENOUS (Tasmania)

WALKER, George Washington (recorder)
Corroberry (on the evening of our arrival, preparations were made for a corrobberry, or dance, for joy at the arrival of the cutter ...     George Washington Walker (James B. Walker, ed.), “Notes on the aborigines of Tasmania, extracted from the manuscript journals of George Washington Walker, with an introduction by James B. Walker, F.R.G.S.”, Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania (1897), 145-175: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/16183 [songs 158-69]: A fire of sticks, or boughs that make a lively blaze, was made, around which the men formed a circle, and began a kind of song or chant, consisting of expressions frequently repeated, and uttered in a drawling monotone. The subjects of these songs are various ; sometimes the pursuits of hunting, and the enumeration of the animals that become a prey to their dexterity ; at other times the feats of war, and their sanguinary conflicts with adverse tribes. A very common description relates to the habits of animals, such as the emu and kangaroo ; and, since they have become acquainted with Europeans, to the horse, the cow, &c. They accompany the words with significant gestures and actions.
The emu-dance (by bending forward an arm over the fire, and making a movement with the hand, like the motion of a bird's head, they imitate the bird in its peculiar habits) As above
    The horse-dance, which they call barracoota (they lay hold of each other's loins, one following another, and imitate the prancing of the animal, while a woman stands by and imitates the driver, gently tapping them with a stick as they pass before her. They have also the thunder-and-lightning dance, in which they stamp with their feet and whirl round the fire)   As above
         
1832-10-15 INDIGENOUS (Tasmania)

WALKER, George Washington (recorder)
Aboriginal Song sung by the Women in chorus (by various Tribes of the Natives of Van Diemens Land) (Nlkkeh ningeh tibreh nickeh mollyga pollyla)   George Washington Walker (James B. Walker, ed.), “Notes on the aborigines of Tasmania, extracted from the manuscript journals of George Washington Walker, with an introduction by James B. Walker, F.R.G.S.”, Papers & Proceedings of the Royal Society of Tasmania (1897), 145-175: http://eprints.utas.edu.au/16183 [song 171-72, also 159-60]
    A popular song among all the aboriginal tribes (of which I have not obtained the meaning, it being involved by them in some mystery) (Poppyla-renung—onnyna)   As above [song, 172. also 159-60]

This is the earliest transcription of a song later documented several times, including as taken down with music by Maria  Logan in October 1836 (see 1836-10-22 below)
         
1833-04-20 CAVENDISH (de Castell), William Joseph
(Ireland 1789-1839)
{Australia 1833-39}
5 quadrilles and 2 waltzes (“The Fairy Quadrilles”; “Australian, Notasian, Arabian, or Mal[a]gareske quadrilles”) (2 Quadrilles have Sydney titles: Woo-loo-moo-loo and Kurry Jong) SL-NSW; Castell family papers, 1786-1993 (MLMSS 7989): MS score and accompanying letter (dated “Parramatta, Notasia [i.e. Australasia], April 20, [18]33”)  
         
1833-06-00 ANONYMOUS A Tasmanian Song (The moon in the Heavens is beaming)   “A TASMANIAN SONG”, The Hobart Town Magazine (June 1833), 186: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=fLwCAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA186
         
1833-10-25 REICHENBERG, Joseph
(Italy c.1789/92-1851)
{Australia 1824-51}
Variations on Oh no we never mention her (“clarionet”)   [Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (25 October 1833), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189158; “At Mr. Peck’s concert […]”, The Hobart Town Courier (1 November 1833), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4189100; “Mr. Peck’s concert [...]”, Colonial Times (5 November 1833), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8647262
         
1833-10-25 PECK, George
(England 1810-1863)
{Australia 1833-39; 1853-63}
Solo (violin) (“collected and diversified from various works of Mayseder, De Beriot, Paganini, &c.”)   As above
         
1834-06-06 ANONYMOUS (music)

“Native sings and dances the corroberee” (indicental song and dance in The Bushrangers, or Norwood Vale)   [Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (6 June 1834), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4184916;

Full text of play: “The Bushrangers, or Norwood Vale”, Hobart Town Magazine (1834), 82: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=DrICAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA82; these musical items, page 84
  ANONYMOUS (music)

? DEANE, John Philip
’Tis said to beauty’s dwelling (song; in The Bushrangers, or Norwood Vale)    
         
1834-09-03 CALVERT, Mr. C. A.
(UK fl.1834)
The Emigrant’s Farewell (words: Robert Gouger Esq.) [? London]: [?], [? 1834] “THE EMIGRANT’S FAREWELL. Sung at the Dinner of the South Australian Colonists, September 3 [1834]”, The Australian (6 February 1835), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42007903; “The Emigrants’ Farewell. Sung at the Dinner of the South Australian Colonists, September 3rd. [1834]”, The Sydney Monitor (7 March 1835), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32148410
         
1834-09-10 ANONYMOUS From towns great and small, and from country we come (New Song to the air of “Home, Sweet Home!”, Said to have been sung by the fair frail ones who arrived by the Steamer from Sydney … on their way from the wharf to the Female Factory …) “NEW SONG”, The Sydney Monitor (10 September 1834), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32147134
         
1834-10-21 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
The Fatal Snow Storm (“in which will be introduced some new and appropriate Music by Mr. Sippe”)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (21 October 1834), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2217359; also [Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (15 October 1834), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32147379; the play was William Barrymore’s The fatal snow-storm: a romantic drama, in two acts (London: T. Richardson, [1830]); datable to 1817 or earlier
         
1834-10-21 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}

WILSON, Mr.
{Australia fl.1830s}
The Demon, or The Magic Rose (“The Music by Messrs. Sippe and Wilson”)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (21 October 1834), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2217359
         
1834-11-07 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1834)

LHOTSKY, John (transcr.)
(Galicia 1795-1866)
{Australia 1832-38}

JOSEPHSON, Joshua Frey (arr.)
(Germany 1815-1892)
{Australia 1820-92}

PEARSON, James (arr.)
(England c.1794-1841)
{Australia 1825-41}

SIPPE, George (arr.)
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
[1] A Song of the Women of the Menero Tribe (“Arranged with the assistance of several Musical Gentlemen”) (2 versions: 1 voice and piano; 2 piano solo)

[2] A Song of the Women of the Menero Tribe (facsimile of [1])
[1] Sydney: John Innes, [1834]

[2] [? Sydney]: [?], [c.late 19C]
“Domestic Intelligence”, The Australian (7 November 1834), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42007225; [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (11 November 1834), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2217523: “SHORTLY WILL BE PUBLISHED, A SONG OF THE WOMEN OF THE MENERO TRIBE, NEAR THE AUSTRALIAN ALPS. ARRANGED With the.assistance of several Musical Gentlemen, FOR THE VOICE AND PIANO-FORTE, Most humbly inscribed as the first specimen of AUSTRALIAN MUSIC […] BY Dr. J. LHOTSKY, Colonist, New South Wales.  TO BE SOLD BY JOHN INNIS, PITT STREET. THIS SONG has been declared by the most competent judges as “very pretty”; by others, even as a “sublime” production […]”; Louis de Freycinet, Voyage Autour du Monde ... les années 1817, 1818, 1819 et 1820, Historique, Tome Deuxième— Deuxième Partie (Paris: Chez Pillet Ainé, 1839), 830 footnote notes the existence of Lhotsky’s 1834 transcription, and corrects Lhostky’s published claim that his was the “premiere spécimen de musique australienne”, Freycinet citing the priority of the Baudin and Field transcriptions; “WOMEN’S COLLEGE LOAN EXHIBITION”, The Sydney Morning Herald (27 May 1895), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13996719
         
1834-11-15 ANONYMOUS The Jackets of Green (“A NEW SONG, GIVING a brief account of the late encounter with the Natives at Pinjärra”) [Perth, ?, 1834] Probably words only were printed or otherwise circulated; apparaneltly a pro-settler account of the battle of Pinjarra, on 28 October 1834; [Advertisement], The Perth Gazette (15 November 1834), 390: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article641185: “BARRIERS OF SPEARS. The Osting of The Bibbulmun”, The West Australian (5 January 1933), 29: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32585326; “NEWS AND NOTES. Jackets of Green”, The West Australian (20 December 1937), 20: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article41600343; probably not the same song as at: “TOWN HALL CONCERT”, The Sydney Morning Herald (18 March 1916), 18: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article15667442
         
1835-? INDIGENOUS

MITCHELL, Thomas Livingston (doc.)
Song of Wollondilly natives (Morruda, yerraba, tundy kin arra)   Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 306: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA306: “Morruda, yerraba, tundy kin arra,/ Morruda, yerraba, min yin guiny wite ma la; Song of Wollondilly natives; meaning: On road the white man walks with creaking shoes;/ He cannot walk up trees, nor his feet-fingers use.”
1835-02-09   Corrobory Dance   February 9, 1835: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 114-16: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA114
         
1835-02-10 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
The Indian Maid (“A New Ballet […] with entire New Music, by Mr. Sippe, and in which Mrs. Jones will sing the Favourite Song of The Indian Maid”)   [Advertisement], The Australian (10 February 1835), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42007481; “Theatricals”, The Australian (13 February 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42006628; ? the song of The Indian Maid that by Knight.
         
1835-03-19 CHILD, Mrs. Farewell to Love (“song [sung by] Mrs. Child [attributed to] Mrs. Child”)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (19 March 1835), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12851713; a song “Farewell to Love sung by Miss Childe” was among new publications from Bland and Waller in London in 1817, “REVIEW OF NEW MUSICAL PUBLICATIONS”, New Monthly Magazine (1 September 1817), 150: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=5_gRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA150   
         
1835-05-28 ANONYMOUS The Revenue Cutter (A New Song by a member of the New South Wales Temperance Society) (I knew by the smoke that incessantly curl’d)   “Original Poetry”, The Colonist (28 May 1835), 6: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31716555
         
1835-06-27 INDIGENOUS

MITCHELL, Thomas Livingstone (doc.)
Dance of the Natives on first hearing the Report of a Pistol   June 27, 1835: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 247: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA247
1835-06-28   Professional Chaunt (by the old men while the natives robbed the blacksmith)   June 28, 1835: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 249: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA249
1835-07-06   Dance of the Natives   July 6, 1835: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 260: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA260
1835-07-22   Chaunt and Demonic Dance   July 22, 1835: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 1 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 283: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=NoIrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA283
         
1835-09-18 LEWIS, Mr. (Bandmaster of H.M. 17th Regiment) {Australia 1830-36} Why don’t the Girls propose (“a new song […] the music composed expressly for Mrs. Taylor by Mr. Lewis”) Words only survive: “Original Poetry”, The Australian (15 September 1835), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42005941 [Advertisement]: “Theatre Royal, Sydney”, The Australian (18 September 1835), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42004566; “THE THEATRE“, The Sydney Gazette (24 September 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2200343; [News]: “Mrs. Taylor’s benefit …”, The Australian (25 September 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42007034; words also survive in UK souce: The Theatrical Observer and Daily Bill of Play (14 May 1835), 1: “The following comic song, written by the elder Parry, was sung by Harley with great applause on the night of his Benefit. Why don't the Girls propose …”.
         
1835-12-10 HELY, Miss
(Ireland ?-?)
{Australia 1823-after 1835}

HELY, Frederick Augustus (Ireland 1794-1836)
{Australia 1823-36}
The Parting (Ballad; words: F. A. Hely) [Dublin: Andrew Ellard, for Francis Ellard, Sydney, 1835] “Sydney General Trade List: IMPORTS”, The Colonist (10 December 1835), 7: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717338: “6 packages musical instruments, F. Ellard”; [News], The Sydney Gazette (12 December 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2201678; “NEW MUSIC”, The Sydney Monitor (12 December 1835), 3s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150302; “AUSTRALIAN MUSIC”, The Sydney Herald (24 December 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654531; “ERRATUM”, The Sydney Herald (28 December 1835), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12853687
         
1835-12-02 INDIGENOUS (Australia fl. 1835)

A new song and dance (which have lately been brought from the regions far beyond Liverpool Plains)   Report by Lancelot THRELKELD dated “Ebenezer, Lake Macquarie, December 2nd, 1835” “MISSION TO THE ABORIGINES”, The Sydney Herald (8 July 1836), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854740
         
1835-12-10 ELLARD, William
(Ireland fl.1835)
The Much Admired Australian Quadrilles (“selected from the newest and most celebrated operas and arranged for the Piano Forte or Harp by W[ilia]m Ellard”) (1 La Sydney (La pantalon); 2 La Wooloomooloo (L'eté); 3 La Illawarra (La poule); 4 La Bong-Bong (La trenise); 5 La Engehurst (La finale)) Dublin: [Andrew] Ellard [for Francis Ellard, Sydney], [1835] “Sydney General Trade List: IMPORTS”, The Colonist (10 December 1835), 7: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717338: “6 packages musical instruments, F. Ellard”; [News], The Sydney Gazette (12 December 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2201678; “NEW MUSIC”, The Sydney Monitor (12 December 1835), 3s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32150302; “AUSTRALIAN MUSIC”, The Sydney Herald (24 December 1835), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654531
         
1835-12-31 STUBBS, Thomas
(Australia 1802-1878)
The Minstrel Waltz for 1836 (piano-forte) [Sydney: Francis Ellard, 1836] [Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (31 December 1835), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654562; [News], The Sydney Herald (4 January 1836), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28654581; “THE MINSTREL WALTZ”, The Sydney Gazette (5 January 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202100
         
1836-01-16 SIMMONS, Joseph
(England ?1810-1893)
{Australia 1830-32; 33-93}
Mock Italian Bravura   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (16 January 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2202266; Simmons perhaps revived the bravura as the Mock Italian Aria in Charles Nagel’s Mock Catalani (or Sham Catalani) in 1842, [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (7 May 1842), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2556440
    Minuet de la Cour    
         
1836-03-01 PAUL, Tempest Margaret
(England 1780-1856)
{Australia fl.1826-37}
Currency Lasses (song; “as composed by our talented towns lady, Mrs. John Paul senior”)   “LAST FRIDAY EVENING’S CONCERT”, The Sydney Gazette (1 March 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203019
         
1836-03-01 WALLACE, William Vincent
(Ireland 1812-1865)
{Australia 1835-38}

PAUL, Tempest Margaret
 
Extemporaneous variations on the song Currency Lasses (“as composed by our talented towns lady, Mrs. John Paul senior”) [submitted theme]   “LAST FRIDAY EVENING’S CONCERT”, The Sydney Gazette (1 March 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203019
         
1836-03-17 INDIGENOUS

MITCHELL, Thomas Livingstone (doc.)
Corrobory Song and Dance   1836, March 17: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 2 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 4-5: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=GIMrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA4
         
1836-03-31 ANONYMOUS The Family Man (A New Song; To be Sung at the next Concert … Tune: We’ll run the risk for a’ that) (John Thomas was a Shropshire man)   “Original Poetry”, The Colonist (31 March 1836), 7: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31717822

The subjects of ridicule in the song are John Thomas Wilson and Maria Taylor 
         
1836-05-13 INDIGENOUS

MITCHELL, Thomas Livingstone (doc.)
Corrobory   1836, May 13: Thomas L. Mitchell, Three expeditions into the interior of eastern Australia ... volume 2 (London: T. & W. Boone, 1839), 77: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=GIMrAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA77
         
? mid 1836 WALLACE, William Vincent
(Ireland 1812-1865)
{Australia 1835-38}
Come to me (song) [Unidentified edition; perhaps imported; advertised on title-page of Fernyhough’s edition of Wallace’s Walze Favorite] Advertised as available at Wallace’s “Academy”, which he announced on 31 March 1836; [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (31 March 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203514
    [1] Bohemian Air: with Brilliant Variations (piano)

[2] Brilliant Variations on a Favorite Bohemian Melody

[3] Bohemian Melody: With Brilliant Variations  
[1] [Unidentified edition. perhaps imported; advertised on title-page of Fernyhough’s edition of Wallace’s Walze Favorite]
NO COPY IDENTIFIED  

[2] London: Cramer, Beale & Co., 1851 (Copy at British Library, Music Collections h.771.(9) [004727345])

[3] New York: Wm. Hall and Son, 1851
As above; plausibly an early edition of [2] and [3]
    Rondo Brillante in E flat (piano) [Unidentified edition: advertised on title-page of Fernyhough’s edition of Wallace’s Walze Favorite  
         
1836-06-13 ANONYMOUS (ed.)
(English)
A Selection of Psalms and Hymns for the principal Festivals of the Church of England, and for family and private use [Sydney: Tegg, 1836]

NO COPY IDENTIFIED
[News], The Sydney Herald (13 June 1836), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12854523: “We have received from Mr. Tegg, the bookseller, a reprint of … The work was originally printed in England, and ordered to be reprinted by the late Rev. R. Hill, for the use of the Churches in this Colony”; [News], The Australian (17 June 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36857166: [reprints words of a hymn by Lord Glenelg (Charles Grant), the Secretary for the Colonies]
         
1836-08-06 “O.” A New Song to an Old Tune (The rampant lang Doctor has bolted awa’,/And in Downing-street you'll find him)   “A NEW SONG TO AN OLD TUNE”, The Sydney Gazette (6 August 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2205890; the Rev. Dr. John Dunmore Lang had recently left Sydney for London
         
? late 1836 WALLACE, William Vincent (arr.)
(Ireland 1812-1865)
{Australia  1835-38}
[1] Walze Favorite, du Duc de Reichstadt, Arranged with Variations for the Piano Forte (“and dedicated to L. Maclean, Esq.“) [Strauss]

[2] Walze Favorite, du Duc de Reichstadt, Arranged with Variations for the Piano Forte [Strauss]
[1] Sydney: W. H. Fernyhough, [?1836]

[2] Sydney: W. Baker, [184-?]
The original, ? Der verfassers beste Laune, by Johann Strauss (see: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=RUP0AAAAMAAJ&pg=PA73 ); rhe title-page of [1] lists the three other works above available at Wallace’s “Academy”, which he first announced in March 1836; [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (31 March 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2203514; as nothing further is heard of Wallace’s Academy after that year, the print can be tentatively dated to late 1836; William Henry Fernyhough (1809-1849), a recent arrival, had commenced business and produced his first prints for sale by 22 September 1836; see [News], The Colonist (22 September 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31718522
         
1836-10-04 INDIGENOUS (NSW)

BACKHOUSE, James (reported)
A new song (We set forth for Bong Bong. There are now three tribes of blacks on the Kangaroo-ground; one of which belongs to the neighbourhood, the others are from Shoal Haven and Bong Bong. I counted forty men in one of these tribes. They are going to Cow-pastrues, to learn a new song, that has been invented by some of their country people there. For an object of this kind they often travel great distances   Extracts from the Letters of James Backhouse: now engaged in a religious visit to Van Dieman’s Land, and New South Wales, accompanied by George Washington Walker, fourth part (third edition; London: Harvey and Darton, 1838), 14: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=rdUpAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA3-PA14
         
1836-10-22 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.? 1830s)

LOGAN, Maria
(Ireland 1812-1886)
{Australia 1835-86}
[1] Song of the Aborigines of Van Diemen’s Land (arranged by Mrs. Logan) (page 1); Song of the Aborigines (page 2) (MS fair copy)

[2] Song of the Aborigines (arranged by Mrs. Logan) (MS sketch)
[1] Original MS at Archives Office of Tasmania, hotograph copies at SL-TAS

[2] MS, at University of Tasmania Library (the catalogue record dates this sketch MS to 1856)
This is another transcription of the second song recorded by George Washington Walker at Flinders Island, on 15 October 1832 (see above)

George Augustus Robinson’s journal for Sunday 22 October 1836 records: “Spent the evening at Logan’s in Macquarie Street. Mr. Logan set to music a song of the aborigines, POPELLER etc., the first ever attempted”;

See N. J. B. Plomley (ed.), Weep in silence: a history of the Flinders Island Aboriginal settlement with the Flinders Island Journal of George Augustus Robinson, 1835-1839 (Hobart: Blubber Head Press , 1987), 391, 657 note; http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/9658451; Alice Moyle, “Tasmanian music, an impasse?“, edited by W.F. Ellis, in Records of the Queen Victoria Museum (Launceston: Museum Committee, Launceston City Council, 1968); http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/10104361; the text is given by Joseph Mulligan (1859), as “ABORIGINAL VERSES in honour of a Great Chief, sung as an accompaniment to a Native Dance or Riawé”; transcribed in N. J. B. Plomley, A word-list of the Tasmanian Aboriginal languages (Launceston: N. J. B. Plomley in association with the Government of Tasmania, 1976), 46; http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/8534842
         
1836-12-29 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
Oberon, or The Charmed Horn (“Grand Romantic Fairy Tale”; “The Music composed and arranged by Mr. Sippe” [? after Weber])   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (17 December 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208354; [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (29 December 1836), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208594; “DRAMA”, The Sydney Gazette (29 December 1836), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208591; “DRAMA”, The Sydney Gazette (3 January 1837), 2-3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208658
         
1837-01-05 SIPPE, George
(Ireland ?-1842)
{Australia 1826-42}
The £100 Note (“The Music composed and arranged by Mr. Sippe”)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (5 January 1837), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2208687
1837-01-28 ? STUBBS, Thomas
(Australia 1802-1878)

COLEMAN, George (arr.)
(Australia 1832-37}

WALLACE, William Vincent (arr.) {Australia 1835-38} 
Australian Minstrel March (“arranged for the occasion by Mr. Coleman”) [? possible published edition, Sydney, ? Fernyhough, ? 1837] “United Australians’ Dinner”, The Sydney Gazette (28 January 1837), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2209082; “Dinner of the United Australians”, The Sydney Herald (30 January 1837), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12861100; “THE JUBILEE WALTZ”, The Sydney Gazette (6 February 1838), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547425

According to the 1838 report, Stubbs's Minstrel Waltz had been “arranged“ by William Vincent Wallace, perhaps suggesting that the March, if it is indee's Stubbs's, was also.
  STUBBS, Thomas
(Australia 1802-1878)
The Australian March (“Thomas Stubbs”) (perhaps the same as, or part of, the work above) [Sydney]: [George Peck], [1860]; or [James Fussell], [1861] (in The Australian Musical Bouquet)  
         
1837-02-02 WALLACE, William Vincent
(Ireland 1812-1865)
{Australia 1835-38}
Echo’s Song (song; “The words by Robert Stewart, Esq[ui]re Composed and dedicated to his friend, Mrs. C. Logan of Hobart Town by Will[ia]m Wallace”) Sydney: J. G. Austin, [1837] “DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE: MUSIC”, The Sydney Herald (2 February 1837), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12861416; [News], The Colonist (2 February 1837), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31719000; [Sydney news], The Hobart Town Courier (17 February 1837), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4173144; an early version of the text appeared anonymously at, “Original Poetry: ECHO’S SONG”, The Australian (20 March 1835), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article42009740; Mrs. Charles (Mary) Logan was Francis Ellard’s sister and Wallace’s cousin, see 1839 below.
         
1837-07-07 or later HAMMOND, Adela A.
(UK 1821-?)
{Australia fl.1837}
The Shadow of the Heart (song; “the poetry by W. H. Harrison, Esq. to whom the music is respectfully inscribed by his obliged young friend, Adela A. Hammond, Melbourne”) [Melbourne?], [?], [1837, or 1842-43?] [Review], The Musical World (7 July 1837), 61; same page, review of “Sleeping in Lily Bells, by  Miss Adela Hammond (Dale & Co. [London?])”; “NEW PUBLICATIONS”, The Literary Gazette and Journal of the Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences, &c. (8 July 1837), 437: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=9r9LAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA437; according to the review, the composer was 16 years old, but makes no mention of the work being printed in Melbourne; whether it was indeed printed in Melbourne, or merely composed there, the music must have been at least 4-5 months in transit before the July 1837 review; in July 1837, the colonial settlement at Melbourne was barely two years old. There must be a strong possibility, then, that there may have been two editions; that the 1837 print is English, and that this is a later local print. Neidorf, A Guide, 41-42, tentatively dates it to 1842-43, which seems far more likely.  
         
1837-09-23 ANONYMOUS Keeping Up Appearances (A New Song to an Old Tune) (Hail! to the Insolvent Law, all hail!)   “KEEPING UP APPEARANCES”, The Cornwall Chronicle (23 September 1837), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65953428
         
After 1837 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl. after 1837)

PETRIE, Tom (learned the song)
(Scotland 1831-1910)
{Australia 1831-1910}

OGG, W. A. (transcr.)
{Australia ? c. 1880}
1 Song (Jabalkan wadli)

2 Song (Mina loranda)
Constance Campbell Petrie (comp.), Tom Petrie’s reminiscences of early Queensland (Brisbane: Watson, 1904), 25, 28 (see also comments on corroboree singing and dancing 19ff) Commentary on 1 (page 24-25): “One of the songs my father can sing was composed by a man at the Pine, and was based upon an incident which really happened. Father heard of the happening at the time, and afterwards learnt the corrobboree. Here is the whole story […]

Commentary on 2 (page 27-28): A Manila man (who afterwards died at Miora, Dunwich, and whose daughter lives there now) once taught a song he knew to the Turrbal blacks. They did not understand its meaning in the least, but learnt the words and the tune, and it became a great favourite with all. My father also picked it up when a boy, and it has since soothed to sleep in turn all his children and two grandchildren. Indeed Baby Annour (the youngest of the tribe) at one time refused to hear anything else when his mother sang to him. “Sing Mi-na “ (Mee-na), he would say, if she dared ;try to vary the monotony. Here is the song […]

See also general comments on corroboree singing and dancing, 19ff
         
c.1838 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1837-39)

GREY, George (transcr.)
{Australia, 1837-39 and later}
1 Fighting-song of the Natives of Western Australia (translation only)

2 Warbunga’s Song (A very favorite song of the natives north of Perth) (words and translation only)

3 One of their comic songs … often sung by the natives in the vicinity of King George Sound (words and translation only)

4 Funeral Chant ... sung by a chorus of females of all ages (words and translations only)

5 War chant of song … of the men (words and translation only)

6 Song composd by a native … when Miago was taken away from Perth, and constantly sung by his mother (words and translation only)

7 Song composed on Miago’s safe return (words and translation only)

8-12 Further songs Nos.1-5 (words and translation only) (9, Song of natives a few miles to the North of Swan River”; 10, “given by Ugat”; 11-12, collected by Alfred P. Bussell)

13 Chant to old Weer-ang her husband (translation only)

14 Chant sung by and old woman, to incite the men to avange the death of a young man (translation only) 
George Grey, Journals of two expeditions of discovery in north-west and western Australia during the years 1837, 38, and 39 ... volume 2 (London: T. and W. Boone, 1841), Volume 2, 300-316 Wilhelm Heinrich I. Bleek, The Library of His Excellency Sir George Grey, philology, pt. 1. Australia (London: Trübner and Co., 1858), 36-38: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=hoE-AAAAYAAJ&pg=PA37
         
Late 1830s INDIGENOUS
(Australia, late 1830s)

TEICHELMANN, C. G. (transcr.)

SCHÜRMANN, C. W. (transcr.)
Kadlitpiko palti (Captain Jack’s Song) (words and translation only)

Mullawirraburkarna palti (King John’s Song) (words and translation only)

Nguyapalti (small-pox song, which they learnt from the eastern tribes, by the singing of which the disease is believed to be prevented or stopped in its progress) (no text given)
C. G. Teichelmann and C. W. Schürmann, Outlines of a grammar, vocabulary, and phraseology, of the aboriginal language of South Australia: spoken by the natives in and for some distance around Adelaide (Adelaide: “Published by the authors at the native location”, 1840), 34, 73 See also: Edward John Eyre, Journals of expeditions of discovery into central Australia, and overland from Adelaide to King George's Sound, in the years 1840-1 ... vol. 2 (London: T. and W. Boone, 1845), 240-241: http://books.google.com.au/books?id=b_soAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA240
 
         
1838-01-19 STUBBS, Thomas
(Australia 1802-1878)

WALLACE, William Vincent (arr.)
{Australia 1835-38}
Australian Jubilee Waltz (“arranged for the piano forte by Wm. Wallace”) Sydney: W. H. Fernyhough, [1838] [Advertisement], “IN THE PRESS And will be published on the 26th instant […] THE AUSTRALIAN JUBILEE WALTZ”, The Australian (19 January 1838), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36855428; “THE JUBILEE WALTZ”, The Sydney Gazette (6 February 1938), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2547425
         
1839-04-05 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
Barcarole with variations (“on a discordant violin composed by himself, in the style of Paganini”)   [Advertisement]: “ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE”, The Sydney Herald (5 April 1839), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12857931
         
1838-04-19 MUNDY, Henry
(England 1798-1848)
{Australia 1831-48}
Eight Sets of Quadrilles (composed by Mr. H. Mundy, of Ellinthorpe Hall, in this Island, dedicated to bis Pupils, very recently published) [London: Robert Cocks, ? 1837]

NO COPY IDENTIFIED
[Advertisement], Launceston Advertiser (19 April 1838), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84755070; [Advertisement], Launceston Advertiser (17 May 1838), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84751180; [Advertisement], The Courier (21 July 1843), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2952410; [Advertisement], Colonial Times (25 July 1843), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8753768
         
1838-12-13 “AN AUSTRALIAN” I am not grieved a fortune to lose (Air - Roslin Castle) (Dec. 1, 1838)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (13 December 1838), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2548797; “LITERATURE”, The Sydney Gazette (13 December 1838), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2548802 “To the Editor”, The Sydney Gazette (22 December 1838), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2538099

See also William Vincent Wallace’s Souvenir d’ecosse, Roslyn Castle, Fantasie de salon (New York: William Hall and Son, 1856)
         
1839-04-26 LOGAN, Maria
(Ireland 1812-1886)
{1835-86}
The vow that’s breathed in solitude (words: Robert Stewart) [? Hobart]: [?], [1839] [News]: “A Song, entitled […]”, The Hobart Town Courier (26 April 1839), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4158722: also Hobart Town Advertiser (10 May 1839): We must not pass lightly by the music of Mrs. Logan, a lady who has the merit of being the first musical compositor in the colony”; [Editorial], “THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 16, 1840”, The Hobart Town Courier (17 April 1840), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8748254: “We are not blessed with hurdy-gurdies or barrel-organs in this hemisphere, but claim some exemption from the tomb of oblivion, in an occasional offering to the muses, which passes through the colony with the swiftness of the Highland fire-brand, visiting the mansion and the cottage, and thereby indicating a taste for the “tender and true”. We allude more particularly to The vow that’s breathed in solitude.” 
         
1839-05-24 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
O Dolce Concento with variations ([Mozart] “composed by Mons. Gautrot”; for soprano)   [Advertisement], The Hobart Town Courier (24 May 1839), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4158477; [Advertisement], Colonial Times (28 May 1839), 8: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8749724
    Variations on the Violin    
         
1839-07-19 “H. K.” If you were at Yass you may have heard a song (Oh! Squatting we will go)   “PORT PHILLIP”, The Hobart Town Courier (19 July 1839), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8747485
         
1839-08-13 REID, James Aquinas
(Scotland 1809-1869)
{Australia 1839-44 }
Oratorio Paradise Lost   “Concert for the benefit of the Poor”, Australasian Chronicle (13 August 1839), 1s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726208; possibly the work mentioned in “Music in Scotland: A BRIEF HISTORICAL SURVEY”, The Musical Times (1 November 1901), 723; there is no suggestion that the work was actually performed in Australia, though W. A. Duncan (editor of the Australasian Chronicle), who knew of it and Reid in Scotland, suggested it might be. 
         
1839-08-16 REID, James Aquinas
(Scotland 1809-1869)
{Australia 1839-44 }
Overture to Zriny   [Advertisement]: “CONCERT”, Australasian Chronicle (16 August 1839), 4s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726249: [Advertisement]: “CONCERT”, The Australian (17 August 1839), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36862661; “Concert”, Australasian Chronicle (23 August 1839), 1s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726296; see also “DR. REID’S CONCERT”, The Colonist (28 August 1839), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31723606; “DR. REID’S CONCERT”, The Sydney Monitor (23 August 1839), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32165280
Scena and Aria O thou sweet star of love on high (“from a new opera”)
    Chorus and Solo Spring is come and the wars are all over (“from a new opera”)    
         
1839-09-28 PECK, George
(England 1810-1863)
{Australia 1833-39; 1853-63}
Imitations of Paganini on the Violin (“for this night only”)   [Advertisement]: “GRAND CONCERT”, The Australian (28 September 1839), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article36861814
         
1839-10-29 REID, James Aquinas
(Scotland 1809-1869)
{Australia 1839-44 }
Mass No. 1 in C   [News], Australasian Chronicle (29 October 1839), 1s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726755
         
1839-11-01 DEANE, John Philip
(England 1796-1849)
{Australia 1822-49}
Trio (for 2 violins and violoncello)   “MR. DEANE’S SOIREE”, Australasian Chronicle (1 November 1839), 1s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726771; [Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (8 November 1839), 4s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726817; [Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (3 January 1840), 4s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31727178; the preceding are the first of many references to Deane and his sons playing trios for 2 violins and violoncello; these works are unattributed, though several later such trios were attributed to “Deane”; a further trio was attributed to “Muller”, see,  [Advertisement], Australasian Chronicle (21 January 1840), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31727355
         
1839-11-09 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
Australiana, A Pastoral (composed for the Ladies of the Colony for violin solo) (also advertised as Australia, A Pastoral)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (9 November 1839), 3:  http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2550699; [Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (13 November 1839), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12857239; “M. GAUTROT’S CONCERT”, Australasian Chronicle (15 November 1839), 1s: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31726856
         
1839-12-00 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl.1839)

DRAYTON, Joseph (transcr.)
(USA 1798-1877)
{Australia 1839}
Four Australian Native Chants, Nos 1-2; Four Australian Native Chants, Nos 3-4 (transcribed NSW, December 1839) Charles Wilkes, Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition during the Years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842, Volume 2 (Philadelphia, 1844?); later printing, (Philadelphia: [?], 1849), 189-90 When the United States Exploring Squadron was anchored in Sydney Harbour in December 1839, one of the expedition’s artists, Joseph Drayton transcribed and later published four “Australian Native Chants”, claiming to have been taken from live performances, all by the same “native”, including a “new song” that he was taking back to his tribe, and another (No 1) that Drayton suspected “not to be entirely native music”. Despite the claim also to have sourced it directly from the “native”, No.3 is essentially identical with Barron Field’s 1823 printed transcription Australian National Melody
         
1839-12-14 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
The Soldier Tir’d [Arne] (with new orchestral accompaniments by Mons. Gautrot)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette (14 December 1839), 1: [http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2549780

See original in an early 19C US edition Arne, The Soldier Tired
         
1840 INDIGENOUS
(Australia fl. c.1840)

ROLFE, N. L.
{Australia fl. c.1840}
Australian Song (Little Boy Lost) with Aboriginal Chant (MS melody line only) MS undated late copy (Melody Line for Aust. Song with Aboriginal Chant Introduced [Woradgery Tribe] Upper Murray 1840); at Canberra, AIATSIS, pms 2552

Reproduced in Saintilan, Music if it be so called, 48
 
         
1840-03-02 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
Success (“words by Linsburg – Music by Mons. Gautrot”)   [Advertisement], The Sydney Herald (2 March 1840), 1: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12864130
         
1840-03-19 ANONYMOUS

? HAILES, Nathaniel (words)
The Adelaide “Tambourgi” (A War-Song after Byron) (Gazette, O! Gazette, O! Thy ’larum afar)   “THE ADELAIDE TAMBOURGI”, Southern Australian (19 March 1840), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71619057; “ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE”, Southern Australian (2 April 1840), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article71619109; “THE ADELAIDE TAMBOURGI”, The Hobart Town Courier (17 April 1840), 3: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8748257

Probably intended to be sung to the setting, Tambourgi, by Isaac Nathan
         
1840-05-25 WITTON, Henry J.
{Australia 1833-after 66}
[1] Old England for ever (“Song, H. Witton”) (1840)

[2] Old England I live but for you (“the poetry by F. Drake, Esq.; an officer late of H.M. Service; composed and arranged with accompaniments for the piano forte, by H. J. Witton, R.A.M.”) (1846)
[2] Unidentified printed edition [1] [Playbill], “ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE, Norfolk Island (25 May 1840); “ROYAL VICTORIA THEATRE. NORFOLK ISLAND”, The Sydney Herald (24 June 1840), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12857518

[2] “NEW MUSIC”, Morning Chronicle (24 January 1846), 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31747234; this unidentified edition was possibly printed at Norfolk Island, while Witton was a prisoner there
    Spirit of the Storm (“Witton“; words: ? James Hogg)    
         
1840-06-07 GAUTROT, Joseph
(France ? -1854)
{Australia 1839-54}
Quintett (for two Tenors, two Violoncellos, and one Double Bass)   “Royal Victoria Theatre: Grand Concert”, The Sydney Herald (6 July 1840), 6: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12864988
         
1840-06-16 ANONYMOUS A favourite new song of the Wollongong Blacks (sung by Chief “Frying Pan” at the last corroboree; Tune — “The Sea!” (My farm! my farm! my goodly farm)   “Original Poetry”, Australasian Chronicle (16 June 1840), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31728478

It would seem uncharacteristic of the Chronicle’s liberal editor W. A. Duncan to include what appears to be this Indigenous parody. I had hoped it might relate to settler Protestant bigotry concerning the new Catholic Church in Wollongong; see, e.g.: 1840 “FRYINGPAN JUNIOR. MR. EDITOR”, Australasian Chronicle (24 October 1849), 2: September, 2013, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31729613

Sadly, perhaps not, as see also below:
         
1840-08-22 ANONYMOUS The Chief “Fryingpan” Again (Know ye not, sons of Koomla* that I am your chief?)   “Original Poetry”, Australasian Chronicle (22 August 1840), 4: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31729029: “An incorrect version of the following speech having appeared  in the Sydney Herald, we are induced to publish the following, which we have just received from our Illawarra correspondent, whose proximity to the scene enables him to picture it with accuracy.”
         
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1841
       

 

Graeme Skinner © 2014

 

   

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